Toast the Crawleys' return with red, white, or rosé.

By Mike Pomranz
September 03, 2019
Nick Brundle Photography/Getty Images / Lot18

Downton Abbey fans have waited nearly four years for the show to finally return, and on September 20, it will — in movie form — with the new film of the same name premiering on American shores. But if you’re already feeling antsy about getting some Downton Abbey in your system, good news: three new Downton Abbey wines are on sale starting today.

Lot18 — which has plenty experience with entertainment-themed booze including Portlandia wine, The Lord of the Rings wine, and even Assassin’s Creed wine — is back again, this time in an official partnership with NBCUniversal and Focus Features for three Downton Abbey wines: a Downton Abbey Sparkling Rose from Val de Loire, France; a 2018 Downton Abbey Bordeaux Blanc; and a 2018 Downton Abbey Bordeaux Rouge. All three wines are being sold exclusively at select Cost Plus World Markets across the country or online at Lot18.com/DowntonAbbey.

Of course, as is often the case with these sort of tie-ins, fans of the show may be left wondering what exactly these wines have to do with the show. The answer, frankly, is not much. Lot18 suggests only that “As the Dowager Countess would say, ‘You’ll find there’s never a dull moment in this house’ — nor with this wine.”

Lot18
Lot18

But that’s not to say that the “collectible” and “limited quantity” wines aren’t necessarily without merit beyond the novelty labels. The Sparkling Rose is described as being from “the oldest sparkling wine company from the Loire with 200 years of winemaking experience,” resulting in a wine that is “beautifully rounded on the palate, with bright, red fruit aromas blending notes of ripe raspberry and delicate mountain strawberry, florals and refreshing acidity.” The Bordeaux Blanc is said to offer “lively and fresh fruit flavors of white grapefruit and lemon … punctuated by lemongrass and mineral nuances on the palate.” And the Bordeaux Rouge is listed as being made from 30-plus-year-old vines at Château Haute Courtiade, which is helmed by 13th generation producer Henri Sicard. The results are described as “elegant and rich, with aromas of red, blackberry and blackcurrant,” resulting in “remarkable balance and complexity, velvety tannins and a long and tasty finish confirming the anticipated aromas.”

Lot18

Could they have hammered home the British theme by choosing English wines instead? Sure. But back in the early 20th century, any aristocratic Brits worth their salt were likely getting all their wine from France anyway. So at the very least, consider that choice historically accurate.

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